Introduction to visual arts in Germany

Introduction to visual arts in Germany

The visual arts are a collective term for the visual creative arts and the term has been used since the early 19th century. Fine arts include arts such as painting, architecture, graphics, drawings, sculpture, and handicrafts. However, modern developments and new media have expanded the term so that it is sometimes not that easy to distinguish the visual arts from others.

The visual arts must, however, be distinguished from the performing arts. These include dance, theater, and film art, which are also of great relevance in Germany.

 

First development in the visual arts

The first works of art came from religious ideas. Over time, sculpture and painting became commissioned works for nobles and wealthy citizens, but of course also for religious institutions. With the discovery of perspective, art changed a lot, so works of art were no longer just an expression of circumstances, but also dealt with utopias, art also began to take on the role of religion.

 

Experience visual arts

There are a wide variety of museums and galleries in Germany where you can experience the visual arts from different eras. A well-known museum is, for example, the “Museum of Fine Arts “in Leipzig, which not only has changing exhibitions but also reveals a lot about the history of Leipzig. The museum also has a library with almost 100,000 books, which makes the library one of the largest museum libraries in Germany. If you are near Germany, prepare your best travel backpacks and consider visiting these wonderful places.

Of course, there is also a lot to see in the German capital: there are large, world-class museum buildings, including the Picture Gallery, the Pergamon Museum, and the Natural History Museum. There are also many other museums with important collections, for example, the Schwule Museum is unique in Europe and the Bauhaus Archive has collections of international importance. Not only do the orientations of the various museums in Berlin differ, but also the funding and sponsorship. For example, some museums are privately run, while others come from public institutions.

Other museums for fine arts can also be found in Stuttgart, Ulm and Dresden, among others.

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