Relationship Between Land Art And Modernity

Relationship Between Land Art And Modernity

Art and nature have a long shared history in terms of themes. From ancient Egyptian tomb landscapes to Roman paintings and Middle Ages masterpieces, there is something for everyone. Nature held a unique interest for painters, particularly from the Renaissance forward. Nature has been a continual source of inspiration, whether in painting, sculpture, or building. While its substance has been worked on for ages, it has been used as a canvas by the “Land Art” movement from the middle of the twentieth century.

Art and Nature: Land Art and Natural Resource Management

Land Art, often known as “Earth Works,” is a kind of art that combines sustainability with art. It arose in the 1960s and was first seen as a counter-movement to the consumer-oriented art scene, symbolizing a societal awakening. The artworks themselves took on the form of a landscape. They couldn’t be transported, and they weren’t for sale in the usual sense. Wood, dirt, and sand, as well as stones and water, were the only natural resources employed. This resulted in a harmonic mix between art and nature, with the geographical area serving as the work’s foundation. The art form is credited with establishing today’s sustainable art culture, and it serves as a vital sustainability message for our knowledge of natural art.

Land Art is a well-known example

Robert Smithson completed “Spiral Jetty,” one of the most iconic Land Artworks of art, in three weeks in April 1970. It’s a massive basalt sculpture in the Utah desert that weighs 5,000 tons. This was carved into the Great Salt Lake in a spiral form. Spiral Jetty, like the rest of the Land Art created, is impacted by the terrain, is exposed to wind and weather, and is thus continuously changing. A perfect illustration of how nature and art interact. The connection between art, nature, and sustainability is not confined to physical media, such as sculptures made of natural materials or paintings created of ecologically acceptable raw materials. As our cross-section of current employment demonstrates, it extends beyond that to include design and multidisciplinary disciplines.

Nature and art in harmony – sustainable art projects of the modern age

Pannaphan Yodmanee
Pannaphan Yodmanee uses a variety of materials in his sustainable art pieces, ranging from found things to organic elements. Traditional Thai art and architecture are reflected in the works. Concrete rocks, minerals, and wrecks are painted over and rebuilt into stunning abstract shapes. These publications attempt to delve into Buddhist cosmology and philosophy. Time, loss, disaster, and death are all-natural events. They compel the observer to consider life’s movement and fluidity.

Chris Maynard
Chris Maynard has been captivated with feathers since he was twelve years old, and they are the basis of his nature art inspiration. As a member of the “Artists for Conservation,” the artist utilizes only naturally abandoned or discarded feathers in his works of art, which integrate biology and ecology. Maynard’s practice revolves around preservation. Even though a feather has finished its life with a bird, he feels it is still valuable and should be reused. He utilizes art as a universal symbol for flight, metamorphosis, success, and optimism, and he celebrates nature via it.

Hiroyuki Nishimura
Hiroyuki Nishimura, a Japanese artist, creates Land Art out of wood that has been deemed useless or abandoned. He carves strange sculptures out of blocks of wood that aren’t appropriate for furniture or architectural use. His entire body of work appears odd in that he attempts to recreate a surrealist dream. They also have the ability to give any neutral room a “natural-artificial” feel, you can also visit Curtain Makers London to make your room more elagant.